2019 Is Around The Corner, How Are You Going To Become A Better Morning Person

2019 Is Around The Corner, How Are You Going To Become A Better Morning Person

With 2019 around the corner, this is a time when new years resolutions are created, primed, and scheduled. A resolution that we often hear surrounds becoming "a better morning person". Although it's a tall task for someone who typically rolls out of bed at 10am, if focused, one would argue that becoming a morning person just takes discipline in order to accomplish.

Although it's often not discussed, becoming a fully functioning morning person relies a lot on your sleep cycle and the bedding that goes with it. How is it that some people wake up at 5:30am everyday with tons of energy, while others can't manage to step out of bed before 10am? It's actually been proven that some of the most successful people wake up early (studies show that 90% of executives wake up before 6am and almost 50% of entrepreneurs wake up 3+ hours before their workday actually begins).

If you want to change your body's rhythm to become a more affective morning person, it's completely possible - although it might be an uphill battle (especially for night owls). You'll need a lot of commitment and dedication to break your old habits, but with some time it's possible to reset your body's internal clock. Follow along our 5 steps below to make the process as easy on your body as possible.

Objective #1: Figure Out Your Ideal Sleep Cycle

If you're an adult, then you probably need to be sleeping between 7-9 hours per night. However, every person is different so it's important to test to see how much sleep you should get each night in order to accomplish your goal. Click here to determine the amount of sleep you need. Once you've determined how many hours you need each night, you can create your sleep goals, and figure out the ideal time that you'd like to go to bed and wake up. 

Objective #2: Set Your Alarm Clock 15 Minutes Early

Did you think it'd be this easy? Start by setting your alarm clock 15 minutes earlier than your usual wake-up time. Don't feel pressured to go cold turkey and wake up super early at your new desired time; it can be too much of a shock to your system and can derail you before you gain the momentum. Instead, gradually allow your body to shift its internal clock. The next day, set your alarm back another 15 minutes. For example, if you normally wake at 9 am but would like to start getting up at 7, set your alarm for 8:45 on Monday morning, 8:30 on Tuesday morning, and so on. This gradual process is a much easier transition on your body, and you'll be less likely to quit (#bodyhacks).

Objective #3: Listen To Your Body, It Will Let You Know When It's Sleepy

Although it might seem like the "thing" to do, try and avoid setting a new "bedtime". Instead, listen to your body and go to sleep when you feel sleepy. Your body is a machine and will adjust to your earlier wake up times, ultimately making you more sleepy in the night time.

Objective #4: Ready. Set. Go.

This is a big test. One that is more difficult to deep sleepers and non-morning people. When your alarm clock goes off in the morning, do whatever it takes to get out of bed! If you have to put your alarm clock on the other side of the room, do it. Open the blinds, turn off the heat or AC, walk the dog, make coffee, do whatever it takes to stay out of bed. Your brain associates bed with sleep, so staying in bed (even if you're awake) will just make it harder for your brain to learn the association of your new wake time.

Objective #5: Consistency Pays

Weekends count! If you're working on readjusting your body to its new internal clock, it makes sense to wake up at a similar time on the weekends to stay consistent (at least for the first couple of months). As smart as your body and brain are, they don't know it's the weekend, which is why it's important to stay consistent even on days when you might not have any obligations.

As mentioned, being an effective morning person relies heavily on your sleep cycle, but also your bedding. Although sleeping on clean sheets may seem like an obvious health benefit, a poll by the National Sleep Foundation showed that 73% of people sleep better on fresh sheets. 

Let Mellanni Fine Linens assist you with conquering your 2019 goal of becoming a morning person!

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Dillon Ceglio

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